Multitasking

Multitasking
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It’s 2024 and we welcome you to the first issue of the second volume of the Journal of Medical Optometry. 2023 was our inaugural year and we released three issues; we started off strong and by every metric we have continued to grow. This issue has articles by clinicians from all over America presenting fascinating cases which have taught me a lot as I read them. I typically read and edit the articles with a football game on in the background, and I’m writing this column on the morning of Super Bowl Sunday. This means that starting tomorrow there will be no more football until the fall and I’ll have to find something else to do while multitasking. I mention this because so many of us (authors, editors or clinicians) are charged with doing many things at all times. We take care of our families, act as good friends, give great care to our patients, and spare some time for ourselves. During that last bit, as doctors we are tasked with using some of that time to learn even more about eyecare, so that we can continue to give great care to our patients. But sometimes it’s hardest to find time for the last part.

Related to that, this month doctors in the VA hospital system heard the news of the dissolution of the Optometry Professional Standards Board. This is the board that grants promotions and raises to Optometrists who publish papers, become board-certified and generally try to advance themselves and the profession. Many of us on the board of JoMO and its audience are VA Optometrists. I think there’s some concern in our family that this might disincentivize VA Optometrists from multitasking in our lives. Taking the time to write up a case or volunteer for a professional organization is not easy, and it’s usually not mandatory. But it’s important. And rewarding. To see your case published is to realize that the time and energy you spent to 1) take care of the patient and 2) understand the condition and situation in a very thorough manner will now enable others to gain knowledge from your work. Patients that you’ll never meet will be better treated because of you. A doctor will search for something to help with her patient and click on your article. A light bulb will go off and an answer will be found. Because of something you took the time to see through to completion.

And these articles in this issue are something that our authors spent time completing, in order to help your patients. The featured article this issue is about a patient who had an acute onset of Charles Bonnet Syndrome caused by topical brimonidine. This is a previously-reported instance, but it’s rare. And now it’s something that will easily be found when a future clinician searches for these terms. The author – Dr. Shelly Kim in Chicago – will have done her part to help a patient she’ll never meet, in addition to the patient she has already examined. Half the articles in this issue are anterior segment-related, including two about conjunctival lesions: a case report by Drs. Wittendorf and Gilbertson-Kuiken and a photo essay by Drs. Njeru and Miller. They are good examples of how slowing down to really examine the conjunctiva can be so important.

So take a small amount of your time that you allocate to yourself and read these articles. And think about clicking on the Submissions tab on the top of the screen. We all have these cases where we think to ourselves “I should really write that up.” Consider this your invitation to do so.

VA Boston | Boston, MA

Dr. Rett is the Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Medical Optometry and the secretary for the American Board of Certification in Medical Optometry. He is the Chief of Optometry at VA Boston and sits on the national Field Advisory Board for Tele Eyecare at the VA. He is adjunct clinical faculty at several optometry schools, lectures nationally and enjoys writing about eyecare whenever and wherever.

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Dr. Provost graduated from New England College of Optometry in 2022 and then completed an ocular disease residency at VA…
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Dr. Ana Bonaldi earned her optometry degree from MCPHS, where she graduated salutatorian, and completed an ocular disease residency at…
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Dr. Rett is the Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Medical Optometry and the secretary for the American Board of Certification…
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Emily Humphreys is an Assistant Professor of Clinical Optometry at the New England College of Optometry (NECO). In addition to…
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John Conto, OD, Dipl. AAO completed his optometric training at the Pennsylvania College of Optometry and finished a residency in…
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Jamie Hogan, OD, Dipl AAO, graduated from the Illinois College of Optometry and completed her Primary Care Optometry residency at…
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Dr. Kane graduated from New England College of Optometry in 2015 and went on to complete an ocular disease/primary care…
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Dr. Klute owns and practices at Good Life Eyecare, a multi-location practice in Eastern Nebraska and Western Iowa. He is…
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Dr. Wittendorf is a 2020 graduate of the Michigan College of Optometry. Upon graduation, she completed an ocular disease residency…
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Dr. Liette graduated from The Ohio State University College of Optometry and completed his ocular disease residency at the Chalmers…
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Dr. Cummings graduated from the University of Missouri St. Louis College of Optometry in 2019 and went on to complete…
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Dr. Kim is the residency coordinator at the Captain James A. Lovell Federal Health Care Center. She is also adjunct…
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Dr. Panchal graduated from Pennsylvania College of Optometry in 2019 and completed an ocular disease, low vision and specialty contact…
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Dr. Njeru is a staff optometrist at the Chillicothe VA Medical Center. He graduated from The Ohio State University: College…
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Dr. Le received her optometry degree from Pennsylvania College of Optometry at Salus University in 2005. After graduation, she served…
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Dr Shust got her undergraduate degree in microbiology at Penn State University and then went on to study at the…